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Compensation PWM Technique for Extended Output Voltage Range in Three-Phase VSI Using Three Shunt Resistors
Compensation PWM Technique for Extended Output Voltage Range in Three-Phase VSI Using Three Shunt Resistors
Journal of Electrical Engineering and Technology. 2014. Jul, 9(4): 1324-1331
Copyright © 2014, The Korean Institute of Electrical Engineers
  • Received : September 10, 2013
  • Accepted : February 20, 2014
  • Published : July 01, 2014
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About the Authors
Seung-Min Shin
School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. (shinmin000@skku.edu)
Rae-Kwan Park
School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. (shinmin000@skku.edu)
Byoung-Kuk Lee
Corresponding Author: School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. (bkleeskku@skku.edu)

Abstract
This paper proposes a compensation PWM technique for the extension of output voltage ranges in three-phase VSI applications using three shunt resistors. The proposed technique aims to solve the dead zone, which occurs in high modulation indexes. In the dead zone, two phase currents cannot be sampled correctly, so that the three-phase VSI cannot be operated up to the maximum output voltage. The dead zone is analyzed in detail, and the compensation PWM algorithm is developed. The proposed algorithm is verified by numerical analysis and experimental results.
Keywords
1. Introduction
In a three-phase voltage source inverter (VSI) used for AC motor applications, the phase current should be precisely monitored and sensed as much as possible to ensure the stable operation of the VSI. In general, highbandwidth current sensors such as a current transducer and hall-effect type current sensor are widely used to sense the phase current. However, in some cost sensitive applications, the number of sensors has been reduced and high-bandwidth sensors have been replaced by low cost ones [1 , 2] .
One of the alternative solutions to monitoring and sensing the phase current is to use a shunt resistor, which has the advantages of low cost and small size. However, the use of shunt resistors leads to two major problems, namely, power loss and dead zone. Implementation of shunt resistors on the main power board increases the power loss. However, the power loss from a few milliohm shunt resistor is negligible in medium power applications like home appliances. Compared to the power loss, the dead zone is a much serious problem. If the output voltage is located in the dead zone, current sampling and reconstruction become limited or impossible without a proper compensation method [3 - 5] .
Two types of phase current sampling techniques using the shunt resistor has been presented in previous studies. One uses a single dc-link shunt resistor connected to a negative dc bus as shown in Fig. 1(a) . The information of three phase currents is reconstructed in the DSP (Digital Signal Processor) by using the measured dc-link current with applied pulse width modulation (PWM) switching patterns. However, in this case, when the active switching vector is not maintained for a sufficient time, a dead zone needs to be considered [6 , 7] . To solve this dead zone problem, which arises from the use of the single dc-link shunt resistor, various strategies have been proposed: adjusted pulse width modulation method [8 , 9] ; modified modulation method [10] ; observer method [11] ; and vector insertion method [12] . However, the single dc-link shunt resistor technique is limitedly used in industrial applications since the reliability of the start-up and low speed control for AC motors is not ensured. The other phase current sampling technique uses three shunt resistors, each connected between the emitter of a power switch and the dc-link negative line as shown in Fig. 1(b) . This technique is widely used in some cost sensitive home applications and vector control drives since there is no limit on the low modulation indexes for the start-up and low speed control and it can provide sufficient reliability and costeffectiveness. However, at high modulation indexes, it also induces the dead zone when the holding time of the zero switching vector is not sufficient for measurement of reliable phase current information in the DSP [13 , 14] .
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Two types of phase current sampling techniques using shunt resistors
Phase current regulation using three shunt resistors cannot be guaranteed above about 90% of the maximum output voltage in space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) [15] . In this problem output voltage range, the holding time of the zero switching vector is not sufficient for current sampling in the DSP. Therefore, in this paper, the advanced PWM technique for the three shunt resistors is proposed to extend the output voltage range of the threephase VSI. With the proposed technique, the three-phase VSI can be controlled up to the maximum output voltage in SVPWM. Moreover, the proposed technique can be implemented simply with the low-cost DSP. The proposed technique is verified by experiments measuring the phase current under various conditions.
2. Analysis of Phase Currents Sampling Using Three Shunt Resistors
- 2.1 General description of phase currents sampling
Unlike the hall-effect type current sensors and current transducers, the three shunt resistors are connected between the emitters of the power switches and the dc-link negative line, respectively, to share the same ground terminal, so they depend on the states of low side switches (S 4 , S 6 and S 2 ) to measure the phase currents. There are eight switching state combinations: active switching vectors (V 1 ~ V 6 ) and zero switching vectors (V 0 and V 7 ). The sampling phase currents for each switching vector are summarized in Table 1 . For the zero switching vector 111, no phase current can be sampled since no phase current flows through any of the shunt resistors. However, in the case of the zero switching vector 000, all phase currents can be sampled since three phase currents are freewheeled through a load and the low-side switches. For phase current regulation in the three-phase VSI, information about at least two phase currents is required. The unknown phase current can be calculated assuming current symmetry, i.e., I U + I V + I W = 0. Therefore, in the cases of vectors V 1 , V 3 and V 5 , information about three phase currents can be obtained. However, in the case of vectors V 2 , V 4 and V 6 , phase current regulation is impossible since only one phase current can be sampled.
Sampling phase currents according to switching vectors
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Sampling phase currents according to switching vectors
In the PWM period (T S = T k + T k+1 + T 0 , k = 1 ~ 5), there are two active switching vectors (V k and V k+1 ) for two active switching vector times (T k and T k+1 ) and two zero switching vectors (V 0 and V 7 ) for a zero switching vector time (T 0 ). For examples, in sector 2, a reference voltage vector (V * ) is calculated as
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In the PWM period T S , at least one of the vectors V 2 , V 4 and V 6 is included, and the switching vector time is changed according to the magnitude and angle of the reference voltage vector. Therefore, in order to obtain information about three phase currents in the DSP, regardless of the switching vectors and the reference voltage vector, the current sampling point must be synchronized with the peak of a PWM carrier since vector V 0 always appears at the peak of a PWM carrier.
- 2.2 Limitation of phase currents sampling
For reliable phase current sampling, the turn-on times of the low-side switches should be longer than the minimum required turn-on time. Based on Fig. 2 , the minimum turnon time is determined as
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Minimum required turn-on time of the low side switch
T MIN includes the IGBT turn-on delay time (T DEL ), phase current rise and settling time (T RS ) and analog-to-digital conversion time (T AD ). T DEL includes the dead time, IGBT driver signal processing time and IGBT turn-on delay time. T AD is related to the extra sample and hold time, which is needed to ensure the ADC operation after the sampling has initiated. If T MIN is not guaranteed, phase current sampling cannot be ensured.
The turn-on times of the low-side switches for each phase are calculated based on the active switching vector time and the zero switching vector time as shown in Fig. 3 . T SHORT , T MIDDLE and T LONG represent the turn-on times of each low-side switch. The largest phase voltage determines T SHORT , the medium one determines T MIDDLE and the smallest one determines T LONG . These times vary according to the switching vectors used in each sector as shown in Table 2 .
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Relationship between the three-phase PWM pattern and the low-side switches turn-on time in sector 1
Limitation phase according to low-side switch turn-on time
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Limitation phase according to low-side switch turn-on time
T LONG is always longer than T MIN because each phase current has a phase shift of 120 degrees. However, T SHORT and T MIDDLE are the limiting factors of phase current sampling since they decrease depending on the output voltage command. Accordingly, T SHORT should satisfy the following condition to ensure measurement of three phase currents at the same time
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If T SHORT does not satisfy condition (3), the corresponding phase current cannot be sampled correctly. Then, T MIDDLE determines whether another phase current can be sampled or not. Therefore, conditions for two phase currents sampling can be written as
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In the conditions (4) and (5), the phase current corresponding to T SHORT cannot be sampled correctly. However, the phase currents corresponding to T MIDDLE and T LONG can be sampled correctly. Consequently, the unknown phase current can be calculated. Nevertheless, it should be noted that if T SHORT and T MIDDLE are shorter than T MIN , the use of the output voltage is limited since two phase currents cannot be sampled accurately; this condition is called the dead zone. Therefore, in the dead zone, the solving technique is strongly required to control and extend the output voltage range for the three-phase VSI using three shunt resistors.
3. Proposed Compensation PWM Technique
In order to reliably use a three-phase VSI using three shunt resistors up to the maximum output voltage vector, three phase currents need to be classified as a measurable phase current or an immeasurable phase current.
- 3.1 Dead zone analysis
In the PWM period T S , T 0 is determined by the highest phase voltage command. As shown in Fig. 4 , if T 0 does not satisfy condition (3), the phase current corresponding to the highest voltage phase command cannot be sampled correctly. The criterion of the reference voltage vector for three phase currents sampling can be calculated as
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where V DC is the dc-link voltage and the f sw is the switching frequency in the three-phase VSI. Furthermore, in this problem region, two phase currents sampling region and only one phase current sampling region exist together according to the magnitude and angle of the reference voltage vector. Especially, the only one phase current sampling region, which is the dead zone, is affected by the holding times of vectors V 2 , V 4 and V 6 .
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Problem region in sector 1 in which three phase current sampling is not possible
Fig. 5 shows the three phase PWM patterns at the maximum output voltage vector for the reference voltage vector angle of 0° and 60°. In the case of Fig. 5(b) , the turn-on times of the low-side switches are obtained by using T 0 and T 1 . The highest phase voltage command does not satisfy condition (3). However, the two phase currents corresponding to T MIDDLE and T LONG can be sampled. In contrast, when θ approaches 60 degrees, T 1 is decreased and T 2 is increased. If condition (5) is not satisfied according to the increase of T 2 , the information about the two phase currents corresponding to T SHORT and T MIDDLE cannot be sampled as shown in Fig. 5(a) . Therefore, a dead zone is generated when the reference voltage vector centers the marked region in Fig. 6 , and it is also generated around V 4 and V 6 same as V 2 .
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Relationship between the angle of the reference voltage vector and the three phase PWM pattern at the maximum output voltage vector
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Classification of unusable reference voltage vector due to the dead zone
- 3.2 Classification of each phase
In each PWM cycle, a criterion, regardless of the magnitude and angle of the reference voltage vector, is needed to determine whether conditions (3) and (5) are satisfied or not. This criterion can be obtained from the magnitude of the phase voltage, which is compared with the PWM carrier to generate the PWM pattern. If the magnitude of the phase voltage is large, the turn-on times of the low-side switches are short and if it is small, the turn-on times of low-side switches are long, therefore, the magnitude of the phase voltage for T MIN can be determined. Consequentially, after the magnitude of the phase voltage for T MIN is determined, phase currents can be classified as either measureable or immeasurable by comparison with each phase voltage. The criterion phase voltage for T MIN can be determined as
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When all phase voltages are smaller than V LIM , all phase currents can be sampled. However, when the largest phase voltage is greater than V LIM , condition (3) is not satisfied as shown in Fig. 7(a) . In this case, the phase current can be classified as immeasurable using Eq. (7) . Furthermore, the dead zone is generated as shown in Fig. 7(b) when the magnitude of the reference voltage vector is bigger than the value of Eq. (6). If one of the three phase voltages is bigger than V LIM , the immeasurable phase current can be calculated in the same way as in the Fig. 7(a) case. However, if two of the three phase voltages are bigger than V LIM , all phase voltages need to be reconstructed to obtain a longer time than T MIN .
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Classification of each phase voltage in SVPWM
- 3.3 Implementation of compensation PWM technique
The compensation PWM technique is implemented through four processes as shown in Fig. 8 . The phase separator process compares each phase voltage with V LIM in order to classify three phase voltages into the measurable phase current and the immeasurable phase current. The phase compensator process reconstructs all phase voltages to measure at least two phase currents when two of the three phase voltages are bigger than V LIM . The next process is the current sampling. When all phase voltages are smaller than V LIM , three phase current sampling is carried out. However, when one or two phase voltages are bigger than V LIM , two phase current sampling is carried out. The current calculator process calculates the unknown phase current information at the end.
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Compensation PWM technique process
Three operation modes are integrated in the compensation PWM technique. The first mode is operated when all phase currents can be sampled directly. Second mode is operated when two phase currents can be sampled. Third mode is operated in the dead zone.
- 3.3.1 Mode 1
When all phase voltages are smaller than V LIM , three phase currents can be sampled directly using the three shunt resistors. This mode is operated in the phase separator process and the current sampling process.
- 3.3.2 Mode 2
When one of the three phase voltages are bigger than V LIM , the immeasurable phase current must be calculated so that it can be classified in the phase separator. In the current calculator, the immeasurable phase current is calculated using the measurable phase current obtained from the current sampling process.
- 3.3.3 Mode 3
When two of the three phase voltages are bigger than V LIM , all voltages need the reconstruction to sample two phase currents as shown in Fig. 9 . Two immeasurable phase currents are classified in the phase separator. In the phase compensator, first, the middle magnitude phase voltage (V MIDDLE ) between two immeasurable phases (V IM_1ph , V IM_2ph ) is determined as follows
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Modified reference voltages and switching states for two phase currents sampling in mode 3
Then, the minimum rate of voltage change to guarantee T MIN in V MIDDLE is calculated as
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If V MIDDLE is reduced by V DIF , its immeasurable phase is changed to the measurable phase. Voltage reconstruction is performed as follows to guarantee T MIN in two phases without change of the line-to-line voltage
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where V SHORT is the biggest phase voltage, V MIDDLE is medium one and V LONG is the smallest one. Using the phase voltage reconstruction as Eqs. (11, 12) and (13), the turn-on times of the low-side switches becomes longer since the reconstructed reference voltage becomes smaller than the reference voltage. V SHORT is changed to V SHORT_DIF , but nevertheless the phase current corresponding to V SHORT_DIF cannot be still sampled. However, V MIDDLE is reconstructed to V MIDDLE_DIF which guarantees T MIN for the phase current sampling. The phase current corresponding to V LONG can be sampled without the voltage reconstruction since the turn-on times of the low-side switches corresponding to V LONG is always longer than T MIN . Thus, the voltage change for phase current sampling is minimized by setting V MIDDLE on the criterion of the voltage reconstruction. Moreover, all phase voltages are reconstructed to sample two phase currents without change of the line-toline voltage. The turn-on times of the low-side switches is changed as follows during the voltage reconstruction.
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where T DIF is added to the turn-on times of the low-side switches through the voltage change. Therefore, since two phase currents corresponding to V MIDDLE and V LONG can be sampled, the remaining phase current corresponding to V SHORT can be calculated using these phase currents in the current calculator.
4. Experimental Results
Fig. 10 shows the entire experimental system including the proposed technique to monitor phase currents. To validate the feasibility of the proposed compensation PWM technique, a VSI using three shunt resistors based on Freescale DSP 56F803 was implemented. V23990-P546-A28 module of Vincotech was chosen for the inverter. The shunt resistor of 10mΩ was employed to sense the phase current. The internal variables inside the DSP were monitored through a 12-bit serial digital-to-analog converter (DAC). The other parameters used in this experiment were as follows: VDC is 310V; TMIN is 23usec; f sw is 5kHz. An experiment was performed in V/F control with an induction motor.
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Experimental test-bed
Fig. 11 shows the reconstruction current waveforms without and with the proposed compensation PWM technique under no load. I U_SAMP and I U_CAL are DAC signals which are sampled by using the ADC in the DSP. I U_SAMP is sampled without the compensation PWM technique and I U_CAL is sampled with the compensation PWM technique. I U is the U phase output current, which is measured using a current probe. Before the application of the compensation PWM technique, I U_SAMP had an extremely distorted waveform in high MI. Especially, when θ is varied between about −60° and 60°, it could not be sampled accurately, as predicted in Sector 3. When MI is 0.66, the phase current information can be sampled correctly since the turn-on times of the low-side switches is longer than T MIN as shown in Fig. 11(a) . In contrast, when MI is bigger than 0.93, I U_SAMP was extremely distorted as shown Figs. 11(b) and (C). When MI is higher than before, the distortion of the ADC signal is getting worse since the region where the phase voltage is bigger than V LIM is increased. However, regardless of the MI, I U_CAL has a nearly similar waveform as I U . Fig. 12 shows the reconstruction current waveform when the three-phase VSI is controlled at full load. When MI is 0.66, the phase current information can be sampled correctly as shown Fig. 12(a) . However, same as Figs. 11(b) and (c), when MI is bigger than 0.93, I U_SAMP is extremely distorted as shown Figs. 12(b) and (C). The difference is that the immeasurable region is shifted since a current phase angle is shifted according to load status. Nevertheless, I U_CAL also has a nearly similar waveform as I U regardless of MI.
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Comparison of compensation PWM technique test according to MI at no load (URef: 10V/div; IU: 10A/div; IU_SAMP and IU_CAL: 5V/div)
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Comparison of compensation PWM technique test according to MI at full load (URef: 10V/div; IU: 20A/div; IU_SAMP and IU_CAL: 10V/div)
5. Conclusion
A three-phase VSI using three shunt resistors cannot be used until the maximum output voltage has been analyzed. From the analysis, three phase currents sampling region, two phase currents sampling region and one phase current sampling region were identified. This paper proposed the compensation PWM technique to use the whole output voltage range of the three-phase VSI using three shunt resistors. The proposed technique classifies the measurable phase current and the immeasurable phase current based on a criterion phase voltage. Therefore, the minimum rate of voltage change to guarantee the minimum required turn-on time of the low-side switch can be calculated. In the dead zone, voltage reconstruction is performed to guarantee T MIN in two phases without change of the line-to-line voltage. As a result, the voltage utilization of the threephase VSI can be improved from low-performance V/F drives to high-performance vector control drives. The validity of the proposed technique has been supported by experimental results.
BIO
Seung-Min Shin He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea, in 2009 and 2011, respectively. Since 2009, he has studied for Ph.D. degree in electrical Engineering at Sungkyunkwan University. His research interests are electric vehicle drives, power electronics and advanced motor drive systems.
Rae-Kwan Park He received the B.S. and the M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, in 1992 and 1994, respectively. Since 2010, he has worked for his Ph. D. degree in Electrical Engineering at Sungkyunkwan University. His research interests include electric motor drives, electrical machines, high/low power DC-DC converter for PHEV/EV and advanced motor drive systems.
Byoung-Kuk Lee He received the B.S. and the M.S. degrees from Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, in 1994 and 1996, respectively and the Ph.D. degree from Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, in 2001, all in electrical engineering. From 2003 to 2005, he has been a Senior Researcher at Power Electronics Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Changwon, Korea. From 2006 Dr. Lee joins at School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea. His research interests include charger for electric vehicles, hybrid renewable energy systems, dc distribution systems for home appliances, power conditioning systems for fuel cells and photovoltaic, modeling and simulation, and power electronics. Prof. Lee is a recipient of Outstanding Scientists of the 21st Century from IBC and listed on 2008 Ed. of Who’s Who in America. Prof. Lee is an Associate Editor in the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics and Power Electronics. He was the General Chair for IEEE Vehicular Power and Propulsion Conference (VPPC) in 2012.
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